Keil and Delitzsch Commentary - Deuteronomy 34:1 - 34:1

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Keil and Delitzsch Commentary - Deuteronomy 34:1 - 34:1


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This Chapter Verse Commentaries:

And Moses went up from the plains of Moab unto the mountain of Nebo, to the top of Pisgah, that is over against Jericho. And the LORD shewed him all the land of Gilead, unto Dan, After blessing the people, Moses ascended Mount Nebo, according to the command of God (Deu 32:48-51), and there the Lord showed him, in all its length and breadth, that promised land into which he was not to enter. From Nebo, a peak of Pisgah, which affords a very extensive prospect on all sides, he saw the land of Gilead, the land to the east of the Jordan as far as Dan, i.e., not Laish-Dan near the central source of the Jordan (Jdg 18:27), which did not belong to Gilead, but a Dan in northern Peraea, which has not yet been discovered (see at Gen 14:14); and the whole of the land on the west of the Jordan, Canaan proper, in all its different districts, namely, “the whole of Naphtali,” i.e., the later Galilee on the north, “the land of Ephraim and Manasseh” in the centre, and “the whole of the land of Judah,” the southern portion of Canaan, in all its breadth, “to the hinder (Mediterranean) sea” (see Deu 11:24); also “the south land” (Negeb: see at Num 13:17), the southern land of steppe towards the Arabian desert, and “the valley of the Jordan” (see Gen 13:10), i.e., the deep valley from Jericho the palm-city (so called from the palms which grew there, in the valley of the Jordan: Jdg 1:16; Jdg 3:13; 2Ch 28:15) “to Zoar” at the southern extremity of the Dead Sea (see at Gen 19:22). This sight of every part of the land on the east and west was not an ecstatic vision, but a sight with the bodily eyes, whose natural power of vision was miraculously increased by God, to give Moses a glimpse at least of the glorious land which he was not to tread, and delight his eye with a view of the inheritance intended for his people.